Motion to Revoke Community Supervision (Probation)

If you have previously plead guilty or no contest to an offense and you were placed on probation or deferred adjudication and you have violated one or more of the conditions of probation, the state may file a Motion to Revoke your probation. If this happens, the judge may issue a warrant for your arrest and will have to appear in court. In many cases where the judge has issued a warrant, there will be no bond set. This means if you are arrested you will not be able to bond out until the bond is set. This requires having a lawyer approach the judge to set a bond.

Depending on the seriousness of the original offense and depending on what the state alleges you did to violate your probation, you could face jail or prison time. Therefore it is important that you have an attorney to represent you at your Motion to Revoke hearing.

Criminal defense attorney Dayna L. Jones has helped many clients continue on with their probation and keep the client out of prison when the state was seeking a prison sentence. Contact the Law Office of Dayna L. Jones at (210) 255-8525 if the state is seeking to revoke your probation.