Assault

Assault charges can vary from misdemeanor simple assault to domestic assault up to felony aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. The collateral consequences for an assault conviction in Texas can be severe. For example, in addition to facing a jail or prison sentence, you could also be barred from owning a firearm, and, if you are not a U.S. citizen, you could face deportation or denial of citizenship. Criminal defense attorney Dayna L. Jones has experience dealing with any type of assault charge. If you have been arrested for an assault, you will need an experienced lawyer to defend your case.

Simple Assault

An assault that causes no bodily injury to another person is generally regarded as a simple assault. In Texas, this type of assault is regarded as a Class C misdemeanor where the range of punishment is up to a $500 fine.

Assault Causing Bodily Injury

An assault that causes injury to another person is a Class A misdemeanor. The injury does not have to be serious.

Domestic Assault

Domestic violence cases are often times very emotional cases due to the relationship between the individuals. When a family member is arrested for assaulting another family member it can be a lot of stress for the entire family. Dayna is sensitive to family violence cases because she understands the extra strain that the charges can cause the individual charged and his or her loved ones. Being convicted of domestic assault carries severe penalties in addition to any possible jail or probation period. For example, someone with an assault on a family member may not be allowed from owning a firearm in the future. Also, the second time you are charged with assault on a family member you may face felony charges. Attorney Dayna L. Jones has successfully represented clients at trial on domestic violence cases and received acquittals (not guilty verdicts) and she has obtained numerous dismissals for her clients.

Assault on a Public Servant

Assault that causes injury to a public servant, such as a police officer, is a Third Degree Felony.

Choking

Choking another individual is a Third Degree Felony; except that it is a second degree felony it is shown that the defendant has a previous charge of family violence.

Aggravated Assault

Aggravated Assault can occur by either causing serious bodily injury to another person or by using or threatening to a deadly weapon during the assault. Aggravated assault is usually a second degree felony, but depending on certain factors of a case it could be a first degree felony.